Somewhat lower alcohol content and higher acidity, along with freshness and fruitiness, characterize the Alto Adige wines of the 2014 vintage. In particular, Pinot Blanc and Sauvignon from medium and high altitudes have turned out well. Schiava wines are typical and invitingly drinkable, Pinot Noirs from higher altitudes are very promising, as is Lagrein in general.

The year 2014 began promisingly. Warm temperatures in the spring brought on early blossoming and budding of the vines. Then, however, came long periods of rain and strong growth at relatively low temperatures. A nearly complete lack of longer dry phases in summer resulted in some of the berries bursting and an increased risk of fungus infection.
The threat of Drosophilla suzukii and fungus infections additionally challenged the winegrowers. Using targeted intervention and the corresponding exertion and additional work, Alto Adige’s wine growers were able to get the problem under control.
Especially the early-ripening varieties, which were already harvested in early September, suffered from the inclement weather. The medium and high altitude vineyards were able to profit from the period of good weather from the end of September to the beginning of October.
Through labor-intensive harvest and significant losses in yield it was possible to supply the wineries with a healthy, flawless harvest of grapes.

The low harvest yield is however a cause for concern for all those involved. Depending on the winery, variety and vineyard, this year’s yield lies between 10 and 30 percent under the long-term average. All in all, around 290,000 hectoliters of wine were produced in Alto Adige in 2014, meaning a decrease from last year of 17%.